The History of the Life of the Late Mr. Jonathan Wild the Great cover

The History of the Life of the Late Mr. Jonathan Wild the Great

Henry Fielding (1707-1754)

1. 01 – Book 1, Chapter 1 [The achievements of Great Men]
2. 02 – Book 1, Chapter 2 [Our Hero's Ancestors]
3. 03 – Book 1, Chapter 3 [Birth, Parentage & Education]
4. 04 – Book 1, Chapter 4 [Mr. Wild's First Entrance into the World]
5. 05 – Book 1, Chapter 5 [Young Master Wild & Count La Ruse]
6. 06 – Book 1, Chapter 6 [Further Conferences between the Count & Master Wild]
7. 07 – Book 1, Chapter 7 [Wild Sets Out on his Travels]
8. 08 – Book 1, Chapter 8 [An Astonishing Instance of Greatness]
9. 09 – Book 1, Chapter 9 [A Visit to Miss Letitia Snap]
10. 10 – Book 1, Chapter 10 [Some Matters Concerning the Chaste Laetitia]
11. 11 – Book 1, Chapter 11 [Notable Instances of Human Greatness]
12. 12 – Book 1, Chapter 12 [Other Particulars relating to Miss Tishy]
13. 13 – Book 1, Chapter 13 [Our Chef-D'Oeuvre]
14. 14 – Book 1, Chapter 14 [The History of Greatness is Continued]
15. 15 – Book 2, Chapter 1 [Characters of Silly People]
16. 16 – Book 2, Chapter 2 [Great Examples of Greatness in Wild]
17. 17 – Book 2, Chapter 3 [Scenes of Softness, Love & Honour]
18. 18 – Book 2, Chapter 4 [On his Misfortune in a Speech]
19. 19 – Book 2, Chapter 5 [Many Surprising Adventures]
20. 20 – Book 2, Chapter 6 [Of Hats]
21. 21 – Book 2, Chapter 7 [Heartfree's Adventures with Wild]
22. 22 – Book 2, Chapter 8 [Greatness to an Immoderate Height]
23. 23 – Book 2, Chapter 9 [More Greatness in Wild]
24. 24 – Book 2, Chapter 10 [Sea-Adventures Very New & Surprising]
25. 25 – Book 2, Chapter 11 [Our Hero in the Boat]
26. 26 – Book 2, Chapter 12 [Strange & Yet Natural Escape of our Hero]
27. 27 – Book 2, Chapter 13 [Conclusion of the Boat Adventure]
28. 28 – Book 3, Chapter 1 [Pitiful Behaviour of Heartfree]
29. 29 – Book 3, Chapter 2 [A Soliloquy of Heartfree]
30. 30 – Book 3, Chapter 3 [The Road to Greatness]
31. 31 – Book 3, Chapter 4 [A Young Hero ... Makes his First Appearance]
32. 32 – Book 3, Chapter 5 [More and More Greatness]
33. 33 – Book 3, Chapter 6 [Fireblood's Adventure]
34. 34 – Book 3, Chapter 7 [Preliminary to the Marriage between Mr. Jonathan Wild and the chaste Laeticia]
35. 35 – Book 3, Chapter 8 [A Dialogue Matrimonial]
36. 36 – Book 3, Chapter 9 [A Base Design on Our Hero]
37. 37 – Book 3, Chapter 10 [Unprecedented Generosity ... Ungrateful Reception]
38. 38 – Book 3, Chapter 11 [A Scheme So Deeply Laid]
39. 39 – Book 3, Chapter 12 [New Instances of Friendly's Folly]
40. 40 – Book 3, Chapter 13 [Something Concerning Fireblood]
41. 41 – Book 3, Chapter 14 [Our Hero Makes a Speech]
42. 42 – Book 4, Chapter 1 [Sentiment of the Ordinary's]
43. 43 – Book 4, Chapter 2 [Concerning Popular Ingratitude]
44. 44 – Book 4, Chapter 3 [The History of Newgate]
45. 45 – Book 4, Chapter 4 [The Dead-Warrant Arrives for Heartfree]
46. 46 – Book 4, Chapter 5 [Containing Various Matters]
47. 47 – Book 4, Chapter 6 [The Foregoing Happy Incident is Accounted For]
48. 48 – Book 4, Chapter 7 [Mrs. Heartfree Relates Her Adventures]
49. 49 – Book 4, Chapter 8 [Mrs. Heartfree Continues]
50. 50 – Book 4, Chapter 9 [Containing Incidents Very Surprizing]
51. 51 – Book 4, Chapter 10 [A Horrible Uproar in the Gate]
52. 52 – Book 4, Chapter 11 [Conclusion of Mrs. Heartfree's Adventures]
53. 53 – Book 4, Chapter 12 [The Contemplation of Greatness]
54. 54 – Book 4, Chapter 13 [Death, Immortality, and Other Grave Matters]
55. 55 – Book 4, Capter 14 [The Highest Consummation of Human Greatness]
56. 56 – Book 4, Chapter 15 [The Conclusion of This History]

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Summary

This novel is sometimes thought of as [Fielding's] first because he almost certainly began composing it before he wrote Shamela and Joseph Andrews. It is a satire of Walpole that draws a parallel between Walpole and Jonathan Wild, the infamous gang leader and highwayman. He implicitly compares the Whig party in Parliament with a gang of thieves being run by Walpole, whose constant desire to be a “Great Man” (a common epithet for Walpole) should culminate only in the antithesis of greatness: being hanged.