Sons and Lovers (Version 2) cover

Sons and Lovers (Version 2)

D. H. Lawrence (1885-1930)

1. Chapter I - Part 1 - THE EARLY MARRIED LIFE OF THE MORELS
2. Chapter I - Part 2 - THE EARLY MARRIED LIFE OF THE MORELS
3. Chapter II - Part 1 - THE BIRTH OF PAUL, AND ANOTHER BATTLE
4. Chapter II - Part 2 - THE BIRTH OF PAUL, AND ANOTHER BATTLE
5. Chapter III - THE CASTING OFF OF MOREL--THE TAKING ON OF WILLIAM
6. Chapter IV - Part 1 - THE YOUNG LIFE OF PAUL
7. Chapter IV - Part 2 - THE YOUNG LIFE OF PAUL
8. Chapter V - Part 1 - PAUL LAUNCHES INTO LIFE
9. Chapter V - Part 2 - PAUL LAUNCHES INTO LIFE
10. Chapter VI - Part 1 - DEATH IN THE FAMILY
11. Chapter VI - Part 2 - DEATH IN THE FAMILY
12. Chapter VII - Part 1 - LAD AND GIRL LOVE
13. Chapter VII - Part 2 - LAD AND GIRL LOVE
14. Chapter VII - Part 3 - LAD AND GIRL LOVE
15. Chapter VIII - Part 1 - STRIFE IN LOVE
16. Chapter VIII - Part 2 - STRIFE IN LOVE
17. Chapter IX - Part 1 - DEFEAT OF MIRIAM
18. Chapter IX - Part 2 - DEFEAT OF MIRIAM
19. Chapter IX - Part 3 - DEFEAT OF MIRIAM
20. Chapter X - Part 1 - CLARA
21. Chapter X - Part 2 - CLARA
22. Chapter XI - Part 1 - THE TEST ON MIRIAM
23. Chapter XI - Part 2 - THE TEST ON MIRIAM
24. Chapter XII - Part 1 - PASSION
25. Chapter XII - Part 2 - PASSION
26. Chapter XII - Part 3 - PASSION
27. Chapter XIII - Part 1 - BAXTER DAWES
28. Chapter XIII - Part 2 - BAXTER DAWES
29. Chapter XIV - Part 1 - THE RELEASE
30. Chapter XIV - Part 2 - THE RELEASE
31. Chapter XV - DERELICT

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Summary

Lawrence summarised the plot of Sons and Lovers in a letter to Edward Garnett in 1912: “It follows this idea: a woman of character and refinement goes into the lower class, and has no satisfaction in her own life. She has had a passion for her husband, so her children are born of passion, and have heaps of vitality. But as her sons grow up she selects them as lovers — first the eldest, then the second. These sons are urged into life by their reciprocal love of their mother — urged on and on. But when they come to manhood, they can't love, because their mother is the strongest power in their lives, and holds them...” The present reader tells the story in his authentic regional English, featuring the East Midlands dialect used by Lawrence in the more intimate exchanges between characters.