The Theory of the Leisure Class cover

The Theory of the Leisure Class

Thorstein Veblen (1857-1929)

1. 01 – Chapter I – Introductory, Part One
2. 02 – Chapter I – Introductory, Part Two
3. 03 – Chapter II – Pecuniary Emulation
4. 04 – Chapter III – Conspicuous Leisure, Part One
5. 05 – Chapter III – Conspicuous Leisure, Part Two
6. 06 – Chapter III – Conspicuous Leisure, Part Three
7. 07 – Chapter IV – Conspicuous Consumption, Part One
8. 08 – Chapter IV – Conspicuous Consumption, Part Two
9. 09 – Chapter IV – Conspicuous Consumption, Part Three
10. 10 – Chapter V – The Pecuniary Standard of Living
11. 11 – Chapter VI – Pecuniary Canons of Taste, Part One
12. 12 – Chapter VI – Pecuniary Canons of Taste, Part Two
13. 13 – Chapter VI – Pecuniary Canons of Taste, Part Three
14. 14 – Chapter VI – Pecuniary Canons of Taste, Part Four
15. 15 – Chapter VI – Pecuniary Canons of Taste, Part Five
16. 16 – Chapter VII – Dress as an Expression of the Pecuniary Culture, Part One
17. 17 – Chapter VII – Dress as an Expression of the Pecuniary Culture, Part Two
18. 18 – Chapter VIII – Industrial Exemption and Conservatism, Part One
19. 19 – Chapter VIII – Industrial Exemption and Conservatism, Part Two
20. 20 – Chapter IX – The Conservation of Archaic Traits, Part One
21. 21 – Chapter IX – The Conservation of Archaic Traits, Part Two
22. 22 – Chapter IX – The Conservation of Archaic Traits, Part Three
23. 23 – Chapter X – Modern Survivals of Prowess, Part One
24. 24 – Chapter X – Modern Survivals of Prowess, Part Two
25. 25 – Chapter X – Modern Survivals of Prowess, Part Three
26. 26 – Chapter XI – The Belief in Luck, Part One
27. 27 – Chapter XI – The Belief in Luck, Part Two
28. 28 – Chapter XII – Devout Observances, Part One
29. 29 – Chapter XII – Devout Observances, Part Two
30. 30 – Chapter XII – Devout Observances, Part Three
31. 31 – Chapter XII – Devout Observances, Part Four
32. 32 – Chapter XIII – Survivals of the Non-Invidious Interests, Part One
33. 33 – Chapter XIII – Survivals of the Non-Invidious Interests, Part Two
34. 34 – Chapter XIII – Survivals of the Non-Invidious Interests, Part Three
35. 35 – Chapter XIV – The Higher Learning as an Expression of the Pecuniary Culture, Part One
36. 36 – Chapter XIV – The Higher Learning as an Expression of the Pecuniary Culture, Part Two
37. 37 – Chapter XIV – The Higher Learning as an Expression of the Pecuniary Culture, Part Three
38. 38 – Chapter XIV – The Higher Learning as an Expression of the Pecuniary Culture, Part Four

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Summary

Originally published by the Norwegian-American economist Thorstein Veblen while he was a professor at the University of Chicago in 1898, the Theory of the Leisure Class is considered one of the great works of economics as well as the first detailed critique of consumerism. In the book, Veblen argues that economic life is driven not by notions of utility, but by social vestiges from pre-historic times. [Summary modified from Wikipedia.]