The Natural History, volume 2 cover

The Natural History, volume 2

Pliny the Elder

1. 01 - Book 6, Chapters 1-5: The Euxine and the Maryandini
2. 02 - Book 6, Chapters 6-14: The Cimmerian Bosporus
3. 03 - Book 6, Chapters 15-20: The Caspian and Hyrcanean sea
4. 04 - Book 6, Chapters 21-23: The nations of India
5. 05 - Book 6, Chapters 24-26: Taprobane
6. 06 - Book 6, Chapters 27-31: Carmania
7. 07 - Book 6, Chapters 32-34: Arabia
8. 08 - Book 6, Chapters 35-37: Aethiopia
9. 09 - Book 6, Chapters 38-39: The comparative distances of places on the face of the earth
10. 10 - Book 7, Chapters 1-4: Man; the wonderful forms of different nations; marvellous births
11. 11 - Book 7, Chapters 5-13: Indications of the sex of the child during the pregnancy of the mother
12. 12 - Book 7, Chapters 14-23: The theory of generation
13. 13 - Book 7, Chapter 24-31: Memory; vigour of mind
14. 14 - Book 7, Chapters 32-44: Precepts the most useful in life
15. 15 - Book 7, Chapters 45-50: Ten very fortunate circumstances
16. 16 - Book 7, Chapters 51-56: Various instances of diseases; death
17. 17 - Book 7, Chapter 57: The inventors of various things
18. 18 - Book 7, Chapters 58-60: The things about which mankind first of all agreed
19. 19 - Book 8, Chapters 1-12: Elephants: their capacity
20. 20 - Book 8, Chapters 13-22: Dragons
21. 21 - Book 8, Chapters 23-35: Panthers
22. 22 - Book 8, Chapters 36-47: The ichneumon
23. 23 - Book 8, Chapters 48-56: Bramble-frogs
24. 24 - Book 8, Chapters 57-69: The leontophonus and the lynx
25. 25 - Book 8, Chapters 70-76: Oxen: their generation; the Egyptian Apis
26. 26 - Book 8, Chapters 77-84: The hog; the wild boar
27. 27 - Book 9, Chapters 1-6: Why the largest animals are found in the sea
28. 28 - Book 9, Chapters 7-16: Dolphins; human beings who have been beloved by dolphins
29. 29 - Book 9, Chapters 17-24: which of the fishes are of the largest size
30. 30 - Book 9, Chapters 25-37: Fishes which conceal themselves during the summer
31. 31 - Book 9, Chapters 38-49: Eels; the murena; various kinds of flat fish
32. 32 - Book 9, Chapters 50-53: Sea-animals which are enclosed with a crust
33. 33 - Book 9, Chapters 54-59: pearls: how they are produced, and where
34. 34 - Book 9, Chapters 60-67: The nature of the murex and the purple
35. 35 - Book 9, Chapters 68-78: Bodies which have a third nature
36. 36 - Book 9, Chapters 79-88: The first person that formed artificial oyster-beds
37. 37 - Book 10, Chapters 1-12: The ostrich; the phoenix; the different kinds of eagles
38. 38 - Book 10, Chapters 13-32: The classification of birds; crows; birds of ill omen
39. 39 - Book 10, Chapters 33-49: Foreign birds which visit us; swallows
40. 40 - Book 10, Chapters 50-62: The acanthyllis and other birds; the merops - partidges
41. 41 - Book 10, Chapters 63-81: The mode of drinking with birds; the porphyrio; the haematopous
42. 42 - Book 10, Chapters 82-98: Terrestrial animals that are oviparous; various kinds of serpents

(*) Your listen progress will be continuously saved. Just bookmark and come back to this page and continue where you left off.

Summary

Naturalis Historia (Latin for "Natural History") is an encyclopedia published circa AD 77-79 by Pliny the Elder. It is one of the largest single works to have survived from the Roman empire to the modern day and purports to cover the entire field of ancient knowledge, based on the best authorities available to Pliny. The work became a model for all later encyclopedias in terms of the breadth of subject matter examined, the need to reference original authors, and a comprehensive index list of the contents. The scheme of his great work is vast and comprehensive, being nothing short of an encyclopedia of learning and of art so far as they are connected with nature or draw their materials from nature. The work divides neatly into the organic world of plants and animals, and the realm of inorganic matter, although there are frequent digressions in each section. He is especially interested in not just describing the occurrence of plants, animals and insects, but also their exploitation (or abuse) by man, especially Romans. The description of metals and minerals is particularly detailed, and valuable for the history of science as being the most extensive compilation still available from the ancient world.