Institutio Oratoria or On the Education of an Orator, volume 1 cover

Institutio Oratoria or On the Education of an Orator, volume 1

Marcus Fabius Quintilianus

1. 00 - Translator's Introduction
2. 01 - Book 1, Letter and Preface
3. 02 - Book 1, Chapter 1
4. 03 - Book 1, Chapter 2
5. 04 - Book 1, Chapter 3
6. 05 - Book 1, Chapter 4
7. 06 - Book 1, Chapter 5
8. 07 - Book 1, Chapter 6
9. 08 - Book 1, Chapters 7 to 9
10. 09 - Book 1, Chapter 10
11. 10 - Book 1, Chapters 11 and 12
12. 11 - Book 2, Chapters 1 to 3
13. 12 - Book 2, Chapter 4
14. 13 - Book 2, Chapters 5 to 7
15. 14 - Book 2, Chapters 8 to 11
16. 15 - Book 2, Chapters 12 and 13
17. 16 - Book 2, Chapters 14 and 15
18. 17 - Book 2, Chapter 16
19. 18 - Book 2, Chapter 17
20. 19 - Book 2, Chapters 18 to 21
21. 20 - Book 3, Chapters 1 to 3
22. 21 - Book 3, Chapters 4 and 5
23. 22 - Book 3, Chapter 6, part 1
24. 23 - Book 3, Chapter 6, part 2
25. 24 - Book 3, Chapter 7
26. 25 - Book 3, Chapter 8
27. 26 - Book 3, Chapters 9 to 11

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Summary

Marcus Fabius Quintilianus was of Spanish origin, being born about 35 A.D. at Calagurris. At Rome he met with great success as a teacher and was the first rhetorician to set up a genuine public school and to receive a salary from the State. He left behind him a treatise "On the causes of the decadence of Roman oratory" (De causis corruptae eloquentiae), some speeches and his magnum opus, the only one to survive to our days. His Institutio Oratoria, despite the fact that much of it is highly technical, has still much that is of interest today, even for those who care little for the history of rhetoric.