The Essence of Christianity cover

The Essence of Christianity

Ludwig Feuerbach (1804-1872)

1. 00 – Preface, Part II
2. 01 – Preface, Part II
3. 02 – Essential Nature of Man
4. 03 – The Essence of Religion Considered Generally, Part I
5. 04 – The Essence of Religion Considered Generally, Part II
6. 05 – God as a Being of Understanding
7. 06 – God as a Moral Being, or Law
8. 07 – Mystery of the Incarnation
9. 08 – Mystery of the Suffering God
10. 09 – The Mystery of the Trinity and the Mother of God
11. 10 – The Mystery of the Logos and Divine Image
12. 11 – The Mysery of the Cosmogonical Principle in God
13. 12 – The Mystey of Mysticism. Part I
14. 13 – The Mystery of Mysticism, part II
15. 14 – The Mystery of Providence
16. 15 – Significance of the Creation in Judaism
17. 16 – The Omnipotence of Feeling
18. 17 – The Mystery of Faith
19. 18 – The Mystery of the Resurrection
20. 19 – The Mystery of the Christian Christ
21. 20 – The Distinction between Christianity and Heathenism
22. 21 – The Significance of Voluntary Celibacy and Monachism
23. 22 – The Christian Heaven, or Personal Immortality, Part I
24. 23 – The Christian Heaven, or Personal Immortality, Part II
25. 24 – The Essential Standpoint of Religion
26. 25 – The Contradiction in the Existence of God
27. 26 – The Contradiction in the Revelation of God
28. 27 – The Contradiction in the Nature of God in General
29. 28 – The Contradiction in the Speculative Doctrine of God
30. 29 – The Contradiction in the Trinity
31. 30 – The Contradiction in the Sacraments
32. 31 – The Contradiction of Faith and Love, Part I
33. 32 – The Contradiction of Faith and Love, Part II
34. 33 – Concluding Applications

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Summary

Taking issue with Hegel’s sense that God, as Logos, is somehow central to all that is, Feuerbach explores his own notion that Christianity, as religion, grew quite naturally from ordinary human observation. Only upon deeper, systematic reflection did people postulate a divine source–God. Religious teaching which loses sight of its own essential rootedness in human experience runs the risk becoming overly abstract, disconnected even, from realities which shape humanity and which impart meaning and dignity to life. Fuerbach illustrates this not only on the example of the doctrine of God, but also with respect to creation, prayer, miracles, Trinitarianism, sacramentalism, and other dogmas at the core of Christianity. (Introduction by Rom Maczka)

Reviews

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What a fantastic rendition of this superlative philosophical classic! This is a must-hear audio book for every well educated citizen office the twenty-first century.