Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 3, Part 1, Slice 3 "Banks" to "Bassoon" cover

Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 3, Part 1, Slice 3 "Banks" to "Bassoon"

Various

(*) No tracks available

Summary

Transcriber's note: A few typographical errors have been corrected: they are listed at the end of the text. Volume and page numbers have been incorporated into the text of each page as: v.03 p.0001.[=a] signifies "a with macron"; [)e] "e with breve"; [h.] "h with dot below"; and so forth.Musical pitches are expressed in Acoustical Society of America notation: C4 is middle C, B3 the tone below.THE ENCYCLOPÆDIA BRITANNICAA DICTIONARY OF ARTS, SCIENCES, LITERATURE AND GENERAL INFORMATIONELEVENTH EDITIONVOLUME IIIAUSTRIA LOWER to BISECTRIX[E Text Edition of Volume III Part 1 of 2, Slice 3 of 3 BANKS to BASSOON] [v.03 p.0333] BANKS, GEORGE LINNAEUS (1821 1881), British miscellaneous writer, was born at Birmingham on the 2nd of March 1821. After a brief experience in a variety of trades, he became at the age of seventeen a contributor to various newspapers, and subsequently a playwright, being the author of two plays, a couple of burlesques and several lyrics. Between 1848 and 1864 he edited in succession a variety of newspapers, including the Birmingham Mercury and the Dublin Daily Express , and published several volumes of miscellaneous prose and verse. He died in London on the 3rd of May 1881.BANKS, SIR JOSEPH, BART. (1743 1820), English naturalist, was born in Argyle Street, London, on the 13th of February 1743. His father, William Banks, was the son of a successful Lincolnshire doctor, who became sheriff of his county, and represented Peterborough in parliament; and Joseph was brought up as the son of a rich man. In 1760 he went to Oxford, where he showed a decided taste for natural science and was the means of introducing botanical lectures into the university. In 1764 he came into possession of the ample fortune left by his father, and in 1766 he made his first scientific expedition to Newfoundland and Labrador, bringing back a rich collection of plants and insects. Shortly after his return, Captain Cook was sent by the government to observe the transit of Venus in the Pacific Ocean, and Banks, through the influence of his friend Lord Sandwich, obtained leave to join the expedition in the "Endeavour," which was fitted out at his own expense...